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The Sleep Schedules Of 27 Of History’s Greatest Minds
What do Freud, Maria Abramovi, Beethoven, and you have in common? For one, the need to sleep.
The science of sleep and its glorious effects on creativity, productivity, and sanity gets a lot of press these days. That said, the sleep habits of some of your favorite writers, musicians, and artists may surprise you a little.
The bedtimes and rising times of history’s greatest minds are inventively illustrated in Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. The infographic seems to debunk the myth that geniuses stay up through the wee hours working manically, and that you’re more creative when you’re tired—most of these 27 luminaries got a wholesome eight hours a night.
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Interesting approach, Balzac.

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The Sleep Schedules Of 27 Of History’s Greatest Minds

What do Freud, Maria Abramovi, Beethoven, and you have in common? For one, the need to sleep.

The science of sleep and its glorious effects on creativity, productivity, and sanity gets a lot of press these days. That said, the sleep habits of some of your favorite writers, musicians, and artists may surprise you a little.

The bedtimes and rising times of history’s greatest minds are inventively illustrated in Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. The infographic seems to debunk the myth that geniuses stay up through the wee hours working manically, and that you’re more creative when you’re tired—most of these 27 luminaries got a wholesome eight hours a night.

Read More>

Interesting approach, Balzac.

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nubbsgalore:

coloured scanning electron microscopy by steve gschmeissner (and sixth photo by nicole ottawa). an electron microscope uses a particle beam of electrons, which have much shorter wavelenghts than photons (visible light) and produce a greatly magnified image of the illuminated specimen (up to 10 million times).

dyk: the tardigrade, or water bear, seen in the last photo, can survive in temperatures of one degree kelvin and tolerate pressures six times that of the deepest oceans. despite preferring simple ground dirt, these creatures (which aren’t technically extremophiles) were shown in one experiment to have survived ten days in the vacuum of space. they can also endure heavy doses of radiation and hibernate for a decade. 

dy-also-k: the maggots of the bluebottle fly (the goofy looking dude in the first photo), are used medicinally to clean wounds. once sterilized, they are placed in a wound where they feed on dead tissue and leave healthy tissue untouched. their saliva contains anti bacterial chemicals which maintain sterility in the area.  

click pic for a description of other photos. see also: previous microscopy posts

OK, I’m just gonna say what I’m thinking here: TINY CONFUSED WALRUS.